What's a Watt?

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What's a Watt?
Power Man with 2 light bulbs
A Watt is the unit of Power.  It listed on every single electrical device you have around the house or the office and it signifies how much power will be used by that electrical device.  For example, the kettle in my kitchen is from NEXT and although fits beautifully in our kitchen is fairly poor with it's energy efficiency and apparently uses between 1450W and 1750W when turned on, the list is endless of the appliances now around the home that consume major amounts of electricity.  One thing that you may not appreciate is that although light bulbs may seem like low wattage in comparison to other power guzzlers in the office or home, they soon add up to be the single biggest contributor to the energy consumption in the home.  This is due to the fact that they may be on most of the time.
Consider my home, it is a 3 bedroom semi and has the following:
Kitchen:
5 x ceiling fitted GU10s at 50W
4 x undercabinet halogen G4 bulbs at 10W
5 x candle lamps incandescent light bulbs at 40W
Lounge:
5 x G9s in a ceiling chandelier at 40W
Hallway:
6 x candle lamps incandescent bulbs at 40W
Bathroom:
6 x MR16 low voltage bulbs at 35W
Bedroom 1:
12 x G4 low voltage bulbs at 10W
2 x golfball table lamp bulbs at 40W
Bedroom 2:
5 x golfball free standing lamp lights at 25W
1 x GLS at 60W
Bedroom 3:
1 x GLS at 60W
If all the lights were on in the house at any one time, the Wattage would be a massive total of 1585W.  When you think how easy it is to leave lights on, this really starts hitting the wallet.
Every 24 hours that all these lights are left on, you are paying £5.32 (assuming the cost of electricity is £0.14).  
The advantage of working in light bulbs is that I know the above and I know how much I can save.  So I changed all of the bulbs over to LEDs and see below how much I saved:
Kitchen:
5 x ceiling fitted GU10s at 50W - Moved to 5W LED GU10s
4 x undercabinet halogen G4 bulbs at 10W - Moved to 1.5W LED G4s
5 x candle lamps incandescent light bulbs at 40W - Moved to 4W LED Candles
Lounge:
5 x G9s in a ceiling chandelier at 40W - Moved to 2.5W LED G9s (took a light level drop as there wasn't a 40W equivalent available)
Hallway:
6 x candle lamps incandescent bulbs at 40W - Moved to 4W LED Candles
Bathroom:
6 x MR16 low voltage bulbs at 35W - Moved to 5W LED MR16 Bulbs
Bedroom 1:
12 x G4 low voltage bulbs at 10W - Moved to 1.5W LED G4s
2 x golfball table lamp bulbs at 40W - Moved to 4W LED Golfball bulbs
Bedroom 2:
5 x golfball free standing lamp lights at 25W - Moved to 3W LED Golfball bulbs
1 x GLS at 60W - Moved to 10.5W LED GLS lamps
Bedroom 3:
1 x GLS at 60W - Moved to 10.5W LED GLS lamps
This works out to be a total of 179.5W throughout the house.  This is 1405.5W less that the original power consumption.  So now if I leave the lights on for 24 hours, it only costs me £0.60.
It is simply a no brainer, and if you want us to do the calculations for you, or work out how much you could save then get in touch or use our unique calculator on every product page to see how much the LED could save you or when it would payback on the purchase price.
We also offer a unique service that we will come around to your home or office and do an energy audit to work out how many watts you are using and we will tell you how much you could save by switching to LED and we will even be able to provide you a quote for changing all your bulbs to LED on the spot and even give them to you there and then.  
That is what we call the LEDSmiths Service.
IMAGE COURTESY OF 'KROMKRATHOG' AT FREEDIGITALPHOTOS.NET

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  • Nicholas Smith
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